Anonymous said: You should known the snake "friend" Harry first meets is actually Nagini aka Voldemorts snake. J.K. Rolling has confirmed that this was her intention but not many people realize it because it's never "officially" been stated in the books. So I guess it's good Harry became friends with Ron....

Well, his snake “friend” is a brown boa constrictor and Nagini is green and venomous, so…

earth to echo (a review? i guess?)

synopsis: inseparable friends tuck, alex, and munch are packing up to move because their sleepy nevada suburb is about to be turned into a freeway. on their last night together, tuck convinces the others to bike out into the desert to investigate a weird phone signal. it pays respectful homage to movies like e.t. while being strongly its own lovely and emotionally engaging product.

i really liked it.

(the words below contain sort of spoilers. nothing major). 

the biggest strengths were probably the four kids who were the main characters. i went in expecting a cute story about a burbling alien robot and some audience stand-in kids and was instead given four distinct, complex protagonists and their quietly stirring story about friendship, connection, and children coming to grips with impermanence. 

so let’s talk about the characters!

first: tuck, the boy with the camera.

tuck is our narrator, dragging video cameras and dorky spy-camera-eyeglasses along for the adventure, because his whole journey is about how desperately he wants to save their town, to stay, to keep his important things close. tuck spends so much of this movie fooling himself, but deep down he knows going into it that his far-fetched plan won’t be able to really keep things from changing, which is why the cameras: he will capture it. and he does. tuck traps them on film, these four young adults, this one night. 

if tuck puts it on camera it means he can keep it. if tuck captures it on film that means they can’t really leave. he wants to keep the things that matter, and that’s what he does. 

emma, who butts in partway through, and who achieves great things throughout the movie by head-butting into things instead of being the little debutante mannequin her upper class family wants. when she bluffs away the suspicious antagonist, she goes on a hysterical lie about these three boys being the only friends who like her for her; which isn’t so much a lie as a want. she’s had other peoples’ dreams and dresses and lives hung on her all her life and she wants her own worth. 

munch, who introduces himself as an “acquired taste” (a description he’s heard from his mother), doesn’t know he has any worth at all. he’s hesitant. he organizes his ketchup packets before he starts eating his lunch. and when the chips are down he takes the neville longbottom path of heroism. 

and then alex the foster kid, who only has one box of possessions, who talks a little alien robot through a panic attack with obvious experience, who freaks out with a quiet burning anger when he is left behind, and who flatly refuses to give up on getting echo home. 

the camera work is occasionally dizzying but altogether worthwhile and appropriate for this movie, which is told so entirely through tuck’s eyes (though arguably it’s more about alex’s heart than anyone’s). 

the background set design was also thoughtfully done. alex’s room is bare except for a single box of his belongings. munch, a nervous, big-hearted boy who makes a telling joke later about being a hoarder, has a room packed with vaguely organized objects. 

also: the title works. earth to echo. this is a story about connection. 

this is a movie about four kids who want things, desperately and sometimes childishly, and who grow up enough to find those things in slightly more real form.

tuck wants things to stay, but he realizes the things he can keep are the important things: not this town, not this childhood, but these friendships he has built that will last across years and states and universes. munch learns he can’t control everything, can’t make everything safe, but he can be a hero. he can be worthwhile without anyone “acquiring” a taste for him. emma finds friends who see things in “mannequin girl” that no one else had been looking for, because she decides to be herself in front of them.

alex can’t get home, but he can get echo home. 

GO WATCH IT. and then COME TALK TO ME ABOUT IT. 

literalmarveltrash:

Marvel Fancast: Arden Cho as Kate Bishop

I have no powers and not nearly enough training, but I’m doing this anyways. Being a super hero is amazing. Everyone should try it

(via doctorcakeray)

peenguin:

do people here have opinions about the hp sorting of avatar: the last airbender characters? specially zuko, katara, aang, sokka, toph, iroh but also anyone else

Aang is Slytherin/Slytherin: refusing to let Katara go when he was trying to open his last chakra, and potentially condemning the world for the love of one girl; crumpling the note to Bato in an attempt to selfishly keep his friends with him; lying to solve the crisis of the Great Divide; cheering on Katara’s theft of the waterbending scrolls. The best way to get Aang to do things, as Bumi, General Howe, the sandbenders, and others learn, is by threatening his friends or his bison.

Note: I’m using primary to mean WHY people do things and secondary to mean HOW.

Katara is a Hufflepuff primary who thinks she ought to be a Hufflepuff secondary, too. Because she is faking the Hufflepuff secondary, what she actually is is a Slytherin secondary. Think about the way her sweetness cracks when Toph irritates her, or how she deals with the pirates’ waterbending scroll, or how delighted she is with Aang’s lies in the Great Divide. (She and Aang bond over their shared secondary).

She grows healthier throughout the series and loses the Slytherin—not that that’s an inherently unhealthy secondary, but it was for her.

Sokka’s a Ravenclaw who thinks he should be a Gryffindor through and through. I love that they do this with Katara and Sokka both. In the way they write the Water Tribes, Gryffindor is a gendered House. Combat is for men; girls are not supposed to be forward, brave, direct, violent, or powerful in obvious ways. Katara is told she is supposed to be kind, mothering, fair, and she tries to be. She tries to perform that simplified model of Hufflepuff.

But she is at her happiest when she is charging at evil, thumbing her nose at the universe, and burning things clean. Think of her burning rage at her mother’s killer, her quiet vigilantism as the Painted Lady, the way she flies at Pakku in the Northern Water Tribe. She is doing these things for true Hufflepuff reasons, I think—empathy and community, fairness, justice, and compassion—but her best tools are Gryffindor’s fire and drive.

The fight with Pakku is one of my favorite culminations for Katara. Her arc in Season 1 traces so elegantly from the sweet, mothering girl whose temper wakes the Avatar to this young woman standing before a great master and refusing to bow to his ignorance and prejudice. Her rage here is a choice not a part of her she’s trying to deny. (“I did that?”). She doesn’t expect to win, but she refuses not to fight with every ounce that she has in her.

A teenage girl with no formal training, except for a cross-world journey that pitted her against spirits, soldiers, pirates and firebenders, she holds her own. The sweet mother of the group, and her moments of triumph in the finale are moments of violence.

Sokka has a parallel journey. He is supposed to be all the things Katara is denied: recklessly brave, a burning fire in his gut. And he tries: charging Zuko and his ship in that first episode, his warrior’s cockiness in that first meeting with Suki.

But think about the Sokka who invents and schemes with Ji the Mechnic in the Northern Air Temple barely a season later—drop that boy in the first episode and he’d have planned something, schemed, not charged with his single weapon at an overwhelming force. He’d have taken the ice-locked Fire Nation ship apart years ago, dismantled its booby traps and used them to set up clever, quirky, effective protections all around their home.

While Katara learns to embrace her Gryffindor, Sokka learns to let his go. They give him a string of mentors for this: remeeting his father, Sokka is no longer a small child and he can see his brave, brave father is first a tactician, a trickster, a Ravenclaw. Piandao the swordsman is one of the last steps of Sokka’s journey, teaching him a kind of combat and identity that lets Sokka put a name to the idea that he loves his original mind more than his brave heart.

Sokka goes from charging in alone to planning a multi-national military attack on the Fire nation capital and helping to invent submarines. End of the day: Ravenclaw/Ravenclaw and proud of it.

Zuko is definitely a loyalist House—either Slytherin or Hufflepuff. Him stealing Aang from Zhao was a pretty clear declaration that his Avatar search is about getting himself back home, not a noble soul doing right by his nation. The poor boy’s definitely not a Claw secondary… Gryffindor maybe? He charges into things the way Katara does. Yes, I like that—it’s one of the ways he and Katara bond, over that secondary.

Consider his defiant standing up in the Fire Lord’s war room to speak up for the young recruits/cannon fodder. Zuko gets his bravery shamed out of him, and he tries now and then to be the Slytherin secondary his father and his sister have perfected, but by the end he reclaims his Gryffindor. Facing down his father, approaching the Gaang openly and honestly, going after his sister head-on to save the world.

Toph: Slytherin primary, I think, and a lot better at it than Aang. Aang is irresponsible and selfish, but Toph is steady and self-fulfilling. She does what she wants because she wants it and she doesn’t let anyone shame her for it; she also keeps an eye on the consequences and ripples of her actions, how they affect other people.

Secondary? Her double life, the ease and purpose with which she code switches in Ba Sing Se, and her con artist antics in the Fire Nation say Slytherin, too. There’s a lot of Slytherin secondaries in this cast.

Aang, Toph, and Azula would then be three very interesting facets of the Slytherin/Slytherin— the selfish youth, the lethal weapon, the rock who stands on her own two feet. I kind of like it. The different levels of selfishness and power. Zuko even points out the similarities between Aang and Azula, when he captures Aang at the North Pole.

tl;dr

Katara is a Puff primary who tries so hard to have a Puff secondary too, but learns to embrace her Gryffindor.

Sokka is a Ravenclaw primary who tries so hard to have a Gryff secondary, but learns to embrace all of his Ravenclaw.

Zuko: Hufflepuff/Gryffindor or Slytherdor.

Aang, Azula, and Toph share a Slytherin/Slytherin sorting at vastly different levels of maturity and responsibility.

Anonymous said: Can I ask why you like Crystal Reed for Kate Bishop???? She's 29 when Kate is supposed to be between 16-21 (depending on the volume), her face shape is completely different from Kates and tbh her featured don't match either. I mean this is just my opinion but it's such a popular fancast and i just dont get it at all?????

doctorcakeray:

ink-splotch:

So, I don’t have Crystal-as-Kate feelings so much as I have Really Strong Kate feelings and also Really Strong Crystal feelings.

Crystal Reed played one of my all-time favorite characters from one of my “ehhhhhhh no stop that” shows: Allison Argent from Teen Wolf. Allison Argent is a complicated, emotional, powerful young woman, the daughter of a hunting family and a dead shot with a bow. Dear Allie was also critically underused by the narrative and Crystal’s phenomenal acting was critically underused and then cut short by the show in general. 

Kate Bishop, of course, is also a teenaged archer with great aim and great one-liners. I have a feeling a lot of fandom’s enthusiasm for Crystal (other than just from Miss Reed being phenomenal at things) comes from the ready access to gifs of her shooting arrows and looking dangerous and often sarcastic. Pretty useful if you want to mock up a gifset of “Kate,” yeah? 

I’m not a comics buff the way doctorcakeray is, but I’ve always been under the impression that face shapes vary pretty drastically between issues and artists, so I don’t tend to put much stock into that particular match-up. And as far as ages go: Allison Argent was also a teenager, actually a little younger than your average Kate Bishop. Hiring older actors to play teens isn’t exactly a rare practice. 

There are a lot of actresses I would be thrilled to see play Kate Bishop. I would honestly just like to see a Kate Bishop (Young Avengers TV show, anyone? If in favor, say AYE), and I would also honestly just love to see Crystal Reed’s talented self on my screen again. Those happening at the same time would THRILL ME GREATLY; but them happening separately would also quite warm my chilly soul. 

Short answer: CRYSTAL WOULD BE REALLY GREAT AT IT, but so would a lot of other people. 

I’m handing this off to doctorcakeray now, though, because she has my favorite fancasts and headcanons for Kate Bishop and y’all should listen to her. 

Crystal Reed is very convenient for fancasts and making gifsets.  Sarcastic, dangerous archer, dark hair, fairly young looking, and really good at playing someone younger.  However, I would not pick her for a fancast.

I want an Asian or half-Asian Kate Bishop.  From what we’ve seen of her dad and his last name, he’s probably white.  We know very little about her mom, though.  She was rich and popular, and she died in Colorado (skiing, I think).  That’s it.  I’d fancast Arden Cho or Adrianne Ho for Kate, but if they start her at 16, odds are we’ll get an unknown, which I’m fine with.  My MCU headcanon (and inky’s, since we share MCU headcanons) is that Kate Bishop is the granddaughter of Jim Morita, because I love legacies like Trip and Sharon and want more.

Here’s a picture of my favorite Kate Bishop cosplay.  I’m sorry I’m terrible at taking photos.

image

(taken at FanimeCon 2014)

Anonymous said: Can I ask why you like Crystal Reed for Kate Bishop???? She's 29 when Kate is supposed to be between 16-21 (depending on the volume), her face shape is completely different from Kates and tbh her featured don't match either. I mean this is just my opinion but it's such a popular fancast and i just dont get it at all?????

So, I don’t have Crystal-as-Kate feelings so much as I have Really Strong Kate feelings and also Really Strong Crystal feelings.

Crystal Reed played one of my all-time favorite characters from one of my “ehhhhhhh no stop that” shows: Allison Argent from Teen Wolf. Allison Argent is a complicated, emotional, powerful young woman, the daughter of a hunting family and a dead shot with a bow. Dear Allie was also critically underused by the narrative and Crystal’s phenomenal acting was critically underused and then cut short by the show in general. 

Kate Bishop, of course, is also a teenaged archer with great aim and great one-liners. I have a feeling a lot of fandom’s enthusiasm for Crystal (other than just from Miss Reed being phenomenal at things) comes from the ready access to gifs of her shooting arrows and looking dangerous and often sarcastic. Pretty useful if you want to mock up a gifset of “Kate,” yeah? 

I’m not a comics buff the way doctorcakeray is, but I’ve always been under the impression that face shapes vary pretty drastically between issues and artists, so I don’t tend to put much stock into that particular match-up. And as far as ages go: Allison Argent was also a teenager, actually a little younger than your average Kate Bishop. Hiring older actors to play teens isn’t exactly a rare practice. 

There are a lot of actresses I would be thrilled to see play Kate Bishop. I would honestly just like to see a Kate Bishop (Young Avengers TV show, anyone? If in favor, say AYE), and I would also honestly just love to see Crystal Reed’s talented self on my screen again. Those happening at the same time would THRILL ME GREATLY; but them happening separately would also quite warm my chilly soul. 

Short answer: CRYSTAL WOULD BE REALLY GREAT AT IT, but so would a lot of other people. 

I’m handing this off to doctorcakeray now, though, because she has my favorite fancasts and headcanons for Kate Bishop and y’all should listen to her. 

"but the rain
Is full of ghosts tonight…"

— Edna St. Vincent Millay, from “Sonnet XLIII” (via fables-of-the-reconstruction)

(via truthhoneyandashes)

street-of-mercy:

Captain America: The Winter Soldier

Sharon: “Like he said. Captain’s orders.”

Rumlow: “You picked the wrong side, agent.”

Sharon: “Depends on where you’re standing.”

(via geardrops)

let the girl go (a melinda may story)

ink-splotch:

The Cavalry once killed twenty men with a single pistol, they say.

Or maybe it was fifty.

The Cavalry once killed a hundred men, they say, on other days, around other campfires, these future agents of SHIELD, these gossipy children. On horseback, they tell the freshmen, and snicker. A hundred men.

The number trips off the tongue. The methods vary, the numbers, and they all trip off the tongue easily—what is twenty dead villains? A hundred? A good day’s work. We’re the heroes, after all.

Fifty, twenty, a hundred—they’re all just syllables. All just sizes of victories, not a careful count of gasping faces.

The Cavalry killed twenty—fifty—a hundred men, and Melinda May saw the light go out of each of them.

-

As a child, Melinda would steal the lid off the kitchen trash can, mount it on one arm, and charge out into the backyard to save the world with her plastic shield.

Read More